Barware Sets – The Ultimate Guide of All Barware Cocktail Sets

barware sets

Have you installed a bar in your residence love to enjoy a homemade cocktail from time to time? Well, you’re not alone as more people nowadays enjoy entertaining indoors as opposed to bars and clubs.

There is nothing better than having a delicious homemade cocktail using your personal barware cocktail sets. Cocktails are quite delicious and pretty easy to make when you have the right tools. All that is needed is the best barware cocktail set and a good recipe, and this is where we come in.

We have researched for you the leading barware cocktail sets that you should have at home. These are the best cocktail sets on the market with excellent features to offer you good value for money. Surprisingly, they are affordable but of high-quality to help you make that perfect cocktail. Ranging from the best blenders to the best bar spoon, these are the best items in this niche.

Cocktail Shakers & Mixers

Bar Spoon & Mixing Glass

bar spoon and mixing glass

Description - The original apparatus for mixing a cocktail: stirring with ice.

The ingredients and ice go in the bar glass, and the spoon is used to agitate or twirl the ice through the ingredients over ten to twenty seconds, chilling and diluting the drink without the undue aeration shaking can cause. 

Traditionally, drinks containing only spirits, wines, non-opaque liqueurs, and bitters are stirred.

Beverages which add fruit juices and dairy products to that mix are, instead, shaken.

Boston Shaker

boston shaker

Cocktail shaking apparatus preferred by most professional bartenders; the key is that the mixing glass creates a seal with the stainless steel half when gently tapped into place. The cocktail can then be shaken without fear of making a mess. (Beginners are advised to practice with water in an before attempting to use a Boston shaker to make cocktails.)

Also, the combination of one simple glass part and one simple metal part allows for very easy and speedy cleanup. Moreover, the utter utility of the pieces made the Boston shaker very popular; the glass half did triple duty - often used as a serving glass for fancy mixed drinks and for beer. It also is used in its own right as a mixing glass.

This was the first style of cocktail shaker ever created and can be seen in use in illustrations as early as 1888.

Cocktail Shaker

cocktail shaker

Also known as - cobbler shaker, julep shaker

Description - A three piece center pour cocktail shaker used in bars but most commonly found in the home.

Available since the late 1800s and at its height of popularity in the 1930s and 40s, it has been produced in a wide range of styles from sleek and minimal to highly ornamented. 

This style of shaker is easier to master than the Boston shaker, although it still requires some practice to shake correctly and avoid the cold contraction which can lead to its parts binding together.

Electric Blender

electric blender

Description - An example of the first popular electric drink mixer. The depicted example is literally the Waring "Blendor", the original commercial drink blender available to the public, envisioned and financed by Fred Waring, popular dance music band leader since 1923.

The device, originally christened the "Miracle Mixer," debuted at the National Restaurant Show in 1937. By 1938, the name had been changed to the Waring Blendor. It was adopted and acclaimed for mixing Polynesian-styled tiki drinks by Don the Beachcomber and remained the behind-the-bar mainstay of many a tiki mixologist for many years to come.

In general, blenders are popular for drink mixing because of their speed and hands-free operation. The term "Blender drinks" has come to denote thick, festive, and dessert-like potions popular among infrequent drinkers.

Hamilton Beach #18 Cocktail Mixer

Hamilton Beach #18 Cocktail Mixer

Also known as - Ron Rico Daiquiri Mixer

Description - The first commercial electric milkshake-style drink mixer. The depicted example is circa 1948 and was badged as a "Daiquiri Mixer", thus capitalizing on the burgeoning blended tropical drinks craze.

Originally patented in 1929 (and this particular model in 1935), there was exactly no difference (other than the Ron Rico Rum badging) between it and a standard Hamilton Beach milkshake mixer.

As with blender-style mixers, it was popular for conveniently blending drinks in quantity and efficient (hands-free) operation.

Electric Cocktail Mixer

electric cocktail mixer

Description - A defunct style of electric drink mixer produced circa 1933 as the "Stevens Electric Mixer".

This example has the optional and uncommon cocktail shaker top, thus combining a blender and a three-piece center pour cocktail shaker.

As with other styles of electric mixers, the main attraction was the convenient, hands-free operation.

More...

Muddler & Glass

muddler & glass

Description - Apparatus used in a style of drink mixing whereby fruit peels, herbs, cube or granular sugar, and other "solid" ingredients are placed in the glass, often with a small amount of sugar, liqueurs and bitters, and then crushed, abraided and/or bruised with a grinding motion of the pestle-like muddler, a shaped stick of hardwood. Additional liquid ingredients are added after muddling is complete.

Note - a common mistake is not muddling long or thoroughly enough. This can result in an inferior drink insofar as the general intention is to extract and activate as much flavor as possible out of ingredients that don't give up everything so readily.

For example, muddling ingredients for an Old Fashioned Cocktail is all about extracting the maximum essential fruit oils from the orange peel, melding it with the sugar, water, and bitters before the addition of the rye or Bourbon whiskey.

If the fruit isn't muddled seriously, much of the underlying flavor ends up missing. Muddlers come in many shapes and sizes and the best are made of unstained, unvarnished hardwood. Muddling can serve various purposes.

Besides the use outlined above, in some regions of the United States all ingredients including ice are combined in a mixing glass and the muddler is used with a strong and rapid up-and-down pumping movement to crush and agitate the contents of the glass. The results are then either poured into a tall glass (or goblet) or strained into a stemmed cocktail glass.


Glasses & Vessels

Balloon Wine Glass

balloon wine glass

Description - A large style of wine glass, used for red and white (though mainly red) wines, popular from the 1960s on.

Besides being designed to hold a relatively large volume of wine compared to its progenitors, it was made to expose a lot of wine surface area, presumably to speed up the "breathing" of the wine while cupping the aroma (or bouquet).

It is a glass well suited to sangria and other wine-based mixed drinks.

Volume - 12.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Bar Glass

bar glass

Also known as - mixing glass

Description - The original glass vessel used for combining and serving mixed drinks (or beer)either hot or cold. Used since at least as far back in time as the 18th century.

Volume - 16.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Beer Goblet

beer goblet

Description - Vessel designed to hold lots of beer, popular 100s of years ago, and repopularized during the 1960s.

Suited to the presentation of large punch-like drinks, often with crushed ice.

Volume - 24.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Beer Mug

beer mug

Also known as - beer stein

Description - The most general concept of this sort of vessel lead a couple different directions in execution; to the simple beer mug depicted, to beer schooners (which see) to the ornate German beer steins of old. Rarely used for mixed drinks, but suited to the Shandy Gaff, and other drinks of that style.

Volume - 12.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Brandy Inhaler

brandy inhaler

Description - The depicted glass, produced by Riedel, is sold as a Scotch glass, but fits the form of the classic brandy inhaler. When the snifter first came into vogue, it took on the name 'inhaler' as well, before receiving its own name. The term derives from the design, whereby one inhales the cupped aromas of the drinking (usually brandy) before sipping.

Volume - 7.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Champagne Saucer

Champagne saucer

Description - For centuries, the traditional Champagne glass style, in either hollow or solid stem. Largely supplanted since the 1970s by tall Champagne glasses in variations of the tulip and flute styles.

The saucer form of this glass is said (almost certainly apocryphally) to derive from the shape of Marie Antoinette's breast, or that of other Royals, depending the version of the story.

Volume - 4.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Champagne Tulip

champagne tulip

Description - A relatively modern styling of Champagne glass which, along with the flute form, has largely supplanted both the traditional solid and hollow-stemmed saucer Champagne glasses. The tulip (and the flute) were designed to hold the effervescent Champagne bubbles longer than the classic saucer did.

Volume - 6.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Claret Glass

claret glass

Also known as - small wine glass

Description - The claret glass was specified to contain claret wine. Claret was a British term to describe what was originally essentially a rosé wine from Bordeaux (clairet in French,) but, by the advent of the cocktail, had simply come to mean red Bordeaux wine.

The claret glass was traditionally small, often with a slight flare at the lip. In later years, the term claret was used somewhat less frequently and the glass became more balloon-shaped.

Volume - 5.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Coconut Shell

coconut shell

Description - A halved coconut shell, with the liquid and coconut meat removed, is occasionally specified as a vessel from which to drink tropical drinks - mainly, as one might imagine, with a coconut flavoring component.

Volume - 4.50 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Coquetier

coquetier

Also known as - egg cup

Description - A classic egg cup, the French word for which was once thought to be the origin, through mispronunciation, of the word "cocktail".

In its own right, it is most historically famous as the presumed vessel of choice into which 19th century New Orleans pharmacist Antoine Amedee Peychaud is said to have mixed his proprietary bitters with Cognac, creating a signature drink which would one day come to be the Sazerac.

Volume - 2.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Cup

cup

Description - Depending upon the book from which a given recipe derives, this term can mean either a cup such as a teacup or a punch cup, or a cup such as a Mint Julep cup - essentially a metal Delmonico or flip glass. The recipe at hand will favor one or the other.

Volume - 6.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Dutch Brandy Glass

Dutch brandy glass

Description - "Dutch Brandy" glass actually denotes two entirely different things. One is a setup whereby a snifter is heated by a candle or lamp, but when specified for drinks, the other earlier term, for a sort of flared mouth cordial glass from which brandy might be sipped, is meant.

Volume - 12.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Dutch Cordial Glass

Dutch cordial glass

Description - A sort of stemmed cordial glass with a slightly flared lip. The main difference between a Dutch brandy glass and a Dutch cordial glass is the degree of the flare. The former has more, the latter, less.

Volume - 1.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Goblet

goblet

Description - The original stemmed or footed vessel, made of metal, glass, ceramic, or wood. From this glass form derived the wine glass, the absinthe glass, and the cocktail glass. Generally large, goblets are used for water, beer, or mixed drinks requiring ample room.

Volume - 7.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Hock Wine Glass

hock wine glass

Also known as - rhine wine glass

Description - A variant of the roemer glass, meant to contain Rhine (or hock) wine. The size and shape of the bowl makes it or the roemer perfect for the construction of a Brandy Crusta.

Volume - 4.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Irish Coffee Glass

irish coffee glass

Description - One of two classic glass styles meant to contain hot beverages of coffee, spirits, and liqueurs - most famously, the Irish Coffee.

Volume - 6.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Jefferson Cup

Jefferson cup

Description - A metal tumbler or cup of sorts meant to contain the same sorts of beverages a mint julep cup might.

Volume - 10.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Lemon Shell

lemon shell

Description - Half of a lemon, with the fruit scooped out, occasionally purposed to hold small mixed drinks - but more often as a garnish IN a drink.

Volume - 1.50 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Lime Shell

lime shell

Description - Half of a lime, with the fruit scooped out, occasionally purposed to hold small mixed drinks - but more often as a garnish IN a drink.

Volume - 1.50 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Orange Shell

orange shell

Description - Half of an orange, with the fruit scooped out, occasionally specified to hold mixed drinks.

Volume - 4.50 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Margarita Glass

Margarita glass

Also known as - coupette glass, coupette

Description - A glass, ubiquitous today, meant to hold the various flavors of frozen Margaritas. Margaritas on the rocks are also served in this glass, but not to as good an effect.

Volume - 12.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Mixing Bowl

mixing bowl

Description - A bowl used, for drink purposes, to blend ingredients together for serving in smaller vessels. One would use a mixing bowl to prepare Tom & Jerry batter, for instance.

Volume - 32.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Mug

mug

Description - Of the coffee mug style, a cylindrical ceramic cup used for hot drinks.

Volume - 12.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

One-drink Hoddle

one-drink hoddle

Also known as - one-drink carafe, one-drink decanter

Description - A holding vessel used in one particular manner of serving cocktails: a small to large amount of the cocktail is poured into the usually-small cocktail glass. The rest (or "dividends") is poured into the hoddle which is then placed in a small bowl of ice at the table.

Volume - 4.50 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Parfait Glass

parfait glass

Description - A glass meant for holding parfaits, in the alcoholic sense, beverages of spirits (generally liqueurs, but often in concert with a straight spirit, perhaps brandy or rum) and ice cream. Similar to a frappe glass but slightly smaller and usually of thicker glass.

Volume - 4.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Port Glass

port glass

Also known as - Madeira glass

Description - A small rounded wine glass meant for sweet fortified wines of the Port and Madiera styles.

Volume - 2.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Punch Bowl

punch bowl

Description - The large bowl in which punch is mixed and iced and from which punch is ladled into cups.

Volume - 64.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Punch Cup

punch cup

Description - The small cup, usually glass or crystal, into which punch is ladled from the punch bowl.

Volume - 64.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Roemer Glass

roemer glass

Description - Decorative glass style dating from 17th or 18th century northern Europe, traditionally of green glass with an ornamental stem, specifically used for drinking white Rhine wines. The hock wine glass and the pub rummer are said to be two later variations of this glass. Also admirably suited to Crustas.

Volume - 4.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Scotch Glass

Scotch glass

Also known as - Scotch inhaler

Description - An interesting glass for nosing and sipping vintage single malt Scotch. It has a bowl like a small snifter and a bit of a chimney as well - so to concentrate the brandy-like Scotch aroma.

Volume - 5.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Sherry Glass

sherry glass

Description - The classic 2 ounce conical wine glass in which sherry has been served for hundreds of years. 19th century bar guides which use a "wineglass" as a unit of measure meant a sherry glass of this volume.

Volume - 2.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Shot Glass

shot glass

Description - A small and compact glass meant simply to contain spirit and nothing more. The shooter fad, however, has reinvigorated the shot glass business.

Volume - 1.50 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Snifter

snifter

Description - A large or small bowl-like glass, with a constricted mouth, specified to contain a small quantity brandy or other quality amber spirit. The design allows for the heat of one's hand to warm the spirit, and the aromatic fumes to collect above the liquor in the glass so to be pleasurably inhaled before sipping.

Volume - 12.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Stirrup Cup

stirrup cup

Description - A cup of the colonial era, associated with the English fox hunt. Stirrup cups were small, most often metal, sometimes glass vessels that often took the form of a fox or elk but could be as simple as the shape of a thimble. Traditionally the cup might hold a "fortifying dram" of brandy taken before the hunt to ward off the chill.

Volume - 2.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Tankard

tankard

Also known as - silver mug

Description - The tankard is the classic British tavern beer mug in use for 500 years, often made of pewter, sometimes with a lid.

Volume - 20.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Tiki Bowl

tiki bowl

Also known as - Scorpion bowl

Description - A product of the fantasy tropical drinks explosion of the late 1940s, the tiki bowl is a generic name for this vessel meant to encompass any of several tiki potations, most notably the Scorpion, served in a bowl for two, with straws. Styling was colorful and adventurous.

Volume - 16.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Tiki Mug

tiki mug

Description - A product of the fantasy tropical drinks explosion of the late 1940s-1960s, the tiki mug is a generic name for this vessel meant to encompass any of many tiki recipes and containers. Shapes and styles varied widely depending on the drink (many drinks came in signature vessels), the venue, and the manufacturer.

Volume - 16.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Vodka Chimney

vodka chimney

Description - One of two major styles of vodka glass, the chimney, so named for its long and narrow tube-like opening, rests in multiples in a bowl of ice, and the vodka is consumed chilled.

Volume - 1.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Vodka Glass

vodka glass

Description - A classic style of shot glass traditional to vodka.

Volume - 1.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

White Wine Glass

white wine glass

Description - An oblong, slightly tapered wine glass, traditionally somewhat smaller than a red wine glass.

Volume - 8.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Red Wine Glass

red wine glass

Description - An oblong, slightly rounded wine glass, traditionally somewhat larger than a white wine glass.

Volume - 10.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Straight Whiskey Glass

straight whiskey glass

Description - Larger than a shot glass, smaller than a rocks glass, the whiskey glass is specified to hold either straight whiskey, "neat" (without ice) or with room for, perhaps, one lump of ice.

Volume - 4.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Copper Mug

copper mug

Description - A variant of the tankard, copper mugs, mainly in a coffee mug style, have been used infrequently through drink history to hold various beverages.

The most famous use must be to hold the Moscow Mule - a drink which began vodka's ascendancy as the world's most popular spirit. With Moscow Mule markings on the mug, it becomes its own category, albeit a single-drink one.

Volume - 12.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Pilsner Glass

pilsner glass

Description - In two classic form factors, the classic non-mug style of beer glass, named for the pilsner brew but generally used for any non-dark beer.

Volume - 14.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Tom & Jerry Cup

Tom & Jerry cup

Description - The mug or cup specified to hold the classic drink of the winter season, the Tom & Jerry (which see).

One spoonful of the batter for the drink is scooped from the Tom & Jerry bowl, 2 ounces of brandy are added in the mug which is then filled with hot water to complete the drink. Often the name Tom & Jerry is emblazoned on mug and bowl.

Volume - 7.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Tom & Jerry bowl

Tom & Jerry bowl

Description - The meduim-sized bowl specified to hold the batter for the classic drink of the winter season (since at least 1862), the Tom & Jerry (which see).

One spoonful of batter, 2 ounces of brandy in a Tom & Jerry mug then filled with hot water completes the drink.

Volume - 32.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Champagne Glass

Champagne glass

Description - Generic term for one of 4 major styles and innumerable minor variants of glass for Champagne and other sparkling wines. Specific styles suited to the drink recipe at hand can be determined by the vintage of the recipe: previous to 1970, saucers were the standard, thereafter tulips and flutes were the rule.

Volume - 6.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Sherry Copita

sherry copita

Description - An elegant, tall-yet-small, tapering straight-sided wine glass traditional for sipping fine Sherry as one might in Jerez.

Volume - 6.50 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Julep Cup

julep cup

Description - A cup of great tradition and old fashioned styling meant to hold spirits, water, liqueurs, ice, and garnishes - including, but not limited to, the Mint Julep.

Volume - 10.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Sazerac Glass

sazerac glass

Description - A slightly larger variant of the rocks glass, though smaller than a double-rocks glass. Suited to Sazeracs and Old Fashioneds, this glass is sometimes badged specifically for the Sazerac - mainly by the Fairmont (formerly Roosevelt) Hotel Sazerac Bar in New Orleans.

Volume - 8.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

California Cocktail Glass

california cocktail glass

Description - A style of stemmed cocktail glass ranging from approximately 2.5 ounces to 3.5 ounces which predated the conical cocktail glass variants in prevalent use today.

Volume - 3.50 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Champagne Flute

champagne flute

Description - A relatively modern styling of Champagne glass which, along with the tulip style, has largely supplanted both the traditional solid and hollow-stemmed saucer Champagne glasses. The flute (and the tulip) were designed to hold the effervescent Champagne bubbles longer than the classic saucer did.

Volume - 6.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Flip Glass

flip glass

Description - Originally, 17th, 18th, and early 19th century flip glasses held a hot mixture of beer, molasses, lemon peel, perhaps sugar and spices, and were heated by plunging a red-hot poker or loggerhead into the mixture.

By the mid-19th century, the drink type (but not the glass) had changed utterly to a dessert drink style that was typified by the ingredients wine or spirits, spice, sweetening, and egg. Only the name, glass, and foamy head connected these two distinctly different beverage types.

The classic Flip glass (which looked much like a bar mixing glass but perhaps 1/2 as tall and with a narrower base) ceased to be manufactured before the onset of Prohibition and, upon the repeal of the 19th Ammendment, the egg drink usually found its way into a flare-lipped claret glass (which see) or similar glass style.

Volume - 12.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Tall Glass

tall glass

Description - "Tall glass" is not a glass style, per se. It is an instruction to use a highball, collins, zombie, or other chimney-style glass at hand instead of a rocks glass, stem, tumbler or other low glass style. A zombie glass is shown.

Volume - 10.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

London Dock Glass

London dock glass

Also known as - hot toddy glass

Description - A handled, footed mug-style glass meant to hold heated mixed drinks - often Irish Coffee and its variants.

Volume - 6.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Zombie Glass

Zombie glass

Description - A tall, chimney-like glass named for the drink, the Zombie (which see), a powerful tiki rum concoction. It is suited for many such drinks, its narrow tallness adding an air of sleekness to a many libations. Produced in both clear and frosted versions.

Volume - 14.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Highball Glass

highball glass

Also known as - hiball glass

Description - A tall glass suited to simple beverages (highballs) which contain a spirit and sparkling water. Larger than the similarly-shaped Delmonico but smaller than the Collins glass or the Zombie glass.

Volume - 9.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Beer Schooner

beer schooner

Description - A particular style of beeg mug, often styled squat and dimpled as shown. A very old design, gaining again in popularity. "Schooner" is also a term denoting a pint.

Volume - 16.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Double Rocks Glass

double rocks glass

Description - A glass type, also known as a bucket for its large size, meant to contain large quantities of mainly tropical punch-style drinks. The form factor is the same as a standard rock glass, only larger.

Volume - 12.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Sour Glass

sour glass

Description - A small stemmed glass, narrow at the stem and tapering out to a wider lip. Specified to contain citrus, sugar, and spirit drinks such as the Whiskey Sour.

Volume - 4.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Pousse Café Glass

pousse cafe glass

Description - Traditionally a sort of narrow, tall cordial glass often to contain a slightly greater volume of liquid than a standard 1 ounce cordial.

The Pousse Café and its variations were liqueur drinks poured in layers so the heaviest liqueur or syrup would settle in the bottom and progressively lighter (lower specific gravity) liqueurs or spirits of differing colors would float atop one another creating a layered rainbow effect.

Pousse Cafes are meant to be sipped one layer at a time, like a chocolate sampler.

Volume - 1.50 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Hurricane Glass

hurricane glass

Description - A large glass designed and badged to contain the proprietary mixture (and its imitators) known as the Hurricane - a passionfruit and rum drink invented and still served at a New Orleans venue named Pat O'Brien's.

Its design mimics that of a hurricane lamp.

Volume - 26.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Rocks Glass

rocks glass

Also known as - small glass, old fashioned glass

Description - A small squat thick-based glass meant to hold ice and spirits or the occasional mixed drink of the Old Fashioned or Sazerac style.

Volume - 6.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Collins Glass

collins glass

Description - A tall glass named for a drink that was named for a London waiter. The Collins glass was originally named for the drink the John Collins, a combination of genever gin, lemon juice, sugar, and water, either sparkling or still.

The drink became a class of drinks with the addition of the Tom Collins (Old Tom gin, originally, in place of the genever - nowadays made with London dry gin instead) and, by 1885, with the Fred Collins made with whiskey.

Subsequently many variations were recorded under a great number of clever names - enough that the glass the drinks all had in common gained its name.

Volume - 12.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Delmonico Glass

Delmonico glass

Also known as - fizz glass, rickey glass.

Description - A glass traditionally used to hold fizzes and Rickeys, two drinks which both contain sparkling water, it was named for the defunct New York restaurant which made it famous.

The more common recent equivalent in size and shape would be the diner or coffee shop breakfast juice glass.

Volume - 5.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Cocktail Glass

cocktail glass

Description - The ubiquitous cocktail glass, in the centuries following the inception of the drink form for which it was named, has taken on many shifting shapes, most - but not all - of which are stemmed.

The stemmed glass was an obvious choice for a cold drink that contained no ice since it allowed the drinker to pick up and hold it without unduly warming the contents of the vessel.

Other variations handle the same need by providing extra thick footed bases which can be held, and in at least one case, the user does pick up the stemless, baseless glass by the bowl, but this glass rests neatly in a small bowl of ice between sips.

The evolution of the cocktail glass, though, was largely through refinement of the goblet - as was the classic stemmed wine glass. The popular conical cocktail glass, though the form had seen happenstance use for other purposes previously, was introduced for its current purpose in Paris at the 1925 Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes (The International Exhibition of Modern Decorative Industrial Arts) which was the debut of the Art Deco movement.

Its use was initially in Europe during American Prohibition, only being really embraced in the States after World War II.

Volume - 4.50 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)

Liqueur Glass

liqueur glass

Also known as - cordial glass, pony glass

Description - A stemmed glass holding 1 ounce volume for the sipping of liqueurs.

Volume - 1.00 oz (default CocktailDB volume; actual specimens may vary)


Bar Tools

Jigger

jigger

Description - A measuring device with one or two cups, each typically with one of these volumes: 1/2 oz, 3/4 oz, 1 oz, 1-1/2 oz, 1-3/4 oz, 2 oz

Siphon

siphon

Description - A refillable device that charges (transfuses) still water with carbon dioxide bubbles, thus producing sparkling water upon demand.

Shown is one stylistic example of seltzer siphon that largely replaced the earlier factory-charged bottles by providing tiny mountable carbon dioxide cylinders which could simply be disposed of and replaced after they were exhausted.

Nutmeg Grater

Nutmeg grater

Description - Small, inexpensive grater used to freshly grate nutmeg over cocktails, particularly those contaiming milk products.

Measuring Spoons

measuring spoons

Description - Measuring implements, typically sold as a connected set, in either imperial or metric units; the former typically provide in 1/4 teaspoon, 1/2 teaspoon, 1 teaspoon and 1 tabelspoon volumes

Measuring Cup

measuring cup

Description - Transparent vessel available in various sizes with marked volume gradations; the best measuring cups for cocktails feature scales for ounces, cups and liters next to each other to make conversions easy to make by eye

Matches

matches

Description - Amongst other uses, essential for flaming lemon and orange twists over the surface of drinks.

Lime Squeezer

lime squeezer

Julep Strainer

Julep strainer

Description - A strainer design based on a slotted spoon that fits neatly inside a typical mixing glass.

Juicer

juicer

Ice Tongs

ice tongs

Description - An implement for relocating one ice cube at a time, typically from an ice bucket to a glass

Ice Scoop

ice scoop

Description - An implement for scooping small quantities of ice from buckets and ice machines

Ice Pick

ice pick

Description - An implement for chipping ice blocks (and separating ice cubes that have fused together)

Cocktail Pick

cocktail pick

Description - Essentially a skewer for garnishes; these come in all manner of materials and designs, from miniature plastic daggers to sterling silver.

Absinthe Spoon

Absinthe spoon

Description - A strainer implement developed for preparing the Absinthe Drip cocktail -- the most famous method for drinking absinthe.

The strainer is placed over an absinthe glass containing a measure of absinthe; a sugar lump is placed on the strainer; and water is dripped very slowly from a pitcher over the sugar cube.

Gradually the water drops dissolve the sugar lump and drip into the absinthe, diluting the liquor and turning it a milky green. Once the sugar is dissolved, the spoon can be used to give the cocktail a quick stir and is then set aside, and the sipping begins.

Muddler

muddler

Also known as - squeezing stick, pestle

Description - A blunt wooden rod or stick available in various dimensions and styles, used for crushing and/or bruising fresh fruits, herbs and other ingredients in a mixing glass in the manner of a mortar & pestle.

In some locales, muddling is also performed as an alternative to shaking, blending, or stirring a drink - using a rapid pumping motion to agitate the ice other ingredients in a bar glass, then straining into a cocktail glass.

The finest muddlers historically have been produced using unvarnished hardwood.

Ebaloy Hand Juicer

Ebaloy hand juicer

Description - An antique juicer of especially practical design, suitable for squeezing citrus fruit up to a medium-sized orange.

The Ebaloy has a cast aluminum clamshell design, hinged by a removable pin, a removable domed crush plate, and spouts on either side so that the fruit can be crushed and the juice decanted in one fluid motion.

Functional specimens appear with some frequency on the antique market, including eBay.

Bar Spoon

bar spoon

Description - A typical, inexpensive bar spoon. Bar spoons are unusually long to fascilitate stirring in tall glasses and for reaching into jars to retrieve olives, cherries and other garnishes.

The twisted portion commonly found in the center of the spoon handle is intended to facilitate rolling the handle between two fingers -- one style of "stirring" a cocktail.

Swizzle Stick

swizzle stick

Description - A stirring stick presented in or beside a cocktail -- usually one served on the rocks -- so the drinker can stir their own drink; swizzle sticks have their own long history of fanciful and promotional designs

Hawthorn Strainer

Hawthorn strainer

Description - A strainer design based on a wire spring that fits neatly atop the stainless steel half of a Boston shaker.

Final Verdict

You no longer have to depend on a mixologist to have your favorite cocktail drink. Get one of these exciting sets and starting making your own cocktail from the comfort of your home. You can make any cocktail drinks using these sets and entertain friends and family instead of going to bars and clubs.

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